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Looking at the world with a bird's eye perspective: Zulkifli


@zhuqincay @zhuqincay @zhuqincay

From an assignment to Papua for National Geographic Indonesia.



From the series of The Sinking Java.


From the series of The Sinking Java.

From the series of The Sinking Java.

A tattoo depicting a young Charles Toto's. Charles Toto is a Chef in Papua. Since 1997, he has consistently introduced indigenous Papuan food to other people. In addition, he also teaches some traditional Papua recipes to the other Papuan. The hope is that authentic Papuan cuisine will not be lost. This was done because of the food consumption of the Papuan people which has begun to change. “The forest is like a market for the Papuan people. The forest has provided all the raw materials for food without us having to spend money to get it," said Toto. Since October 2020, the man who is familiarly called 'Jungle Chef' has established a restaurant called Ungkea Jungle Resto in the sago forest area in Waibu, Sentani.



Portrait of Aman Lepon, a shaman from the Salakhirat tribe, Mentawai.

Some women wear traditional Minangkabau clothes.



Deer skulls, student school hats, and children's paintings are displayed at one of the residents' houses in Kampung Sereh, Jayapura. This photo is an outtake photo from my assignment to Papua a few months ago. Kampung Sereh is one of the villages located on the slopes of the Cycloop Mountains. The Cycloop Mountains are in critical situation due to forest encroachment activities, logging activities, and settlements that are rampant in the area. This condition caused a major flood to occur several years ago, which destroyed houses and infrastructure around the river, even causing hundreds of casualties. One of the villages that was affected by the flood was this Sereh Village.



Portrait of Daud Wouw (19), a guide while looking for Cendrawasih in the customary forest of Rhepang Muaif village, Papua. Daud is Alex Waisimon's nephew who initiated forest conservation in Rhepang Muaif. In this village, forest encroachment has occurred since the 1970s. Due to forest encroachment, Cendrawasih has lost its habitat. Since seven years ago, the customary forest in this village has been managed by Alex. With the people in his village, Alex has succeeded in developing various potentials in this village. One of them makes several bird-watching points in the forest. Now, this customary forest is the habitat for eight species of Cenderawasih, Mambruk, Cassowary, and several other bird species.



From an assignment to Papua for National Geographic Indonesia.



@zhuqincay @zhuqincay @zhuqincay